Policies

Academic Policies

Special Options

Online Learning

Undergraduate courses offered online will be open to all students admitted to Mount Mercy University and eligible to enroll. It is recommended that students have at least sophomore status. Current students will enroll through the normal registration processes applicable based on their program (e.g. traditional, adult accelerated.)

Students should consult with their advisors to determine whether an online course, for example in the Summer term, would be a good choice as part of their academic planning. Students considering an online course will be expected to complete a self-assessment tool that will be made available prior to registration. Administered online, this type of self-evaluation is designed to help students consider their readiness for the responsibilities of online learning and will alert them to possible concerns as well as resources available for further advice.

Students will be expected to complete an online orientation or tutorial session before enrolling in their first online course. The purpose of the online course orientation session is to familiarize students with the learning management system (Moodle) used for delivering these courses. Tutorials for using Moodle will be available as part of the electronic course pages for all online courses.

Online courses will typically be 5 or 10 weeks in duration. Students will need to pay close attention to the start and end dates for each online class considered, as these will not necessarily be the same as their other classes.

The standard to be used for determining attendance in cases of a withdrawal or drop will be the last date that the student logged in to the course, unless regulations dictate otherwise.

Assessment of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL)

Mount Mercy offers an opportunity for students to request that substantial work-related or other prior learning experiences and accomplishments be evaluated for potential academic credit. The Assessment of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) process requires that eligible students submit a portfolio documenting specific learning outcomes attained through previous personal or professional experiences. Qualifications for students seeking APEL review include:

  1. They must be at least 25 years of age. Students who do not meet the age guidelines but feel they should be considered for assessment may petition the Provost for consideration.
  2. They must be officially enrolled in a degree program at Mount Mercy.
  3. They must be able to demonstrate that the experiential learning for which they intend to seek credit is related to their educational goals at Mount Mercy.
  4. They must complete the assessment process, including the credit evaluation, prior to their final semester.

Students participating in the APEL process are allowed to submit a revised portfolio for consideration just one time. The maximum number of credits to be granted through portfolio assessment is 30 semester hours, and it is possible that no credit will be granted. Faculty evaluators will recommend the amount of assessed credit, within the maximum noted above, to the Provost for final approval. The credit may be applied to core curriculum, electives, or majors or minors depending on: 1) the content and level of learning assessed; and 2) the approval and recommendation of the appropriate academic departments. Credits earned through the APEL process are NOT considered part of the 30 semester hours required to be taken at Mount Mercy.

Once the credit has been approved, it will be recorded on the transcript as credit hours in experiential learning with a title specified by the faculty evaluators. The credit will be listed on the transcript with a grade of Pass (P) and is not calculated in the cumulative GPA. Credit will not be granted when it will duplicate college credits previously earned, nor will students receive Mount Mercy credit when it will duplicate credit previously earned through an assessment or prior experiential learning.

College Level Examination Program

Credit may be earned by demonstrating academic achievement as measured by the College Level Examination Program (CLEP).

A full-course credit (three semester hours) may be earned in each of the 34 subject examinations by scoring at or above a specific score level; course credit varies in the general examinations. Information explaining the procedures and passing test scores can be obtained in the Registrar’s Office, 211 Warde Hall.

Any Mount Mercy student or prospective student is eligible to earn up to a maximum of 60 semester hours through CLEP exams*. In those cases where CLEP scores are 10 years old or older, students must petition the Provost's Office. CLEP scores over 10 years old will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Please see CLEP guidelines available in the Registrar’s Office for passing scores, credit awards and fees.

*

CLEP credits do not count against the 63 hour maximum transferable from a 2-year college.

Challenge Examination

Various departments in Mount Mercy offer challenge examinations to validate previous college course credit work or independent learning.

The examinations are scheduled and administered through the individual departments. Students should contact the Provost's Office to obtain the Challenge Examination approval form. There is a fee assessed to the student for the Challenge Exam. Please refer to the Tuition and Fees section.

Cross-Registration at Coe College

Mount Mercy University has a cross-registration agreement with Coe College that permits Mount Mercy students to enroll in no more than one course per fall or spring semester at Coe College. There is no cross-registration agreement during the winter or summer terms. The cross-registration agreement enables students to take courses not offered at Mount Mercy, and is dependent on course and space availability at Coe College. Mount Mercy students must be full-time; in good standing academically, financially, and behaviorally; and must have fulfilled any prerequisite or other requirements for a course at Coe College. The student will pay tuition and apply for financial aid at Mount Mercy.

Mount Mercy students enrolled in a Coe College course who are accused of academic dishonesty will follow Coe College’s academic dishonesty policy. Mount Mercy’s Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Officer is permitted to work with Coe College when Mount Mercy students who have requested accommodations through Mount Mercy’s ADA Officer enroll in a Coe College course.

To enroll in a Coe College course, the following process must be followed:

  1. Seek approval of your advisor and department chair.
  2. Fill out an approval form obtained from the Provost's Office to enroll and count credit toward a requirement at Mount Mercy.
  3. Once approved, register for the course at Coe College.
  4. Submit a copy of the registration to the Registrar’s Office at Mount Mercy to ensure you are also registered at Mount Mercy.
  5. To drop a course, follow Coe College procedures and provide a copy of the Coe College drop slip to the Registrar’s Office at Mount Mercy for official course withdrawal.

If Coe College’s grade choices do not coincide with grade choices at Mount Mercy, the grade will be converted to the most appropriate grade at Mount Mercy (e.g. A+ will be converted to A).

Advanced Placement

Entering freshmen who have successfully completed college-level courses in high school and who earn a rating of three, four or five on the Advanced Placement Test of the College Entrance Examination Board will be given credit for an equivalent college-level course. Students seeking admission to Mount Mercy may be considered for advanced placement by having a report of their examination sent to the Registrar’s Office. Persons wishing information about test centers, test dates, etc., should visit: apcentral.collegeboard.com.

Military Education

Military education will be evaluated upon the receipt of an AARTS transcript, other military transcript or discharge papers, including DANTES.

Second Major

Mount Mercy current students: A student taking two separate majors while working toward a first baccalaureate degree at Mount Mercy earns a second major, not two degrees. Both majors shall be recorded on the student’s transcript, but only one baccalaureate degree shall be granted. If the two majors lead to separate degrees (e.g., B.A. and B.S.), the student shall make the decision of which degree to pursue and that degree shall be recorded on the transcript once the work is completed.

Mount Mercy graduates and graduates of other institutions: A person holding a baccalaureate degree from Mount Mercy or a person who holds a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution may earn a second major at Mount Mercy by fulfilling the following requirements:

  1. The student must be admitted or readmitted to Mount Mercy and to a major other than his or her original major.
  2. The student must complete the requirements for the major as described in the Catalog in effect at the time of admission or readmission to Mount Mercy.
  3. Students must earn 12 semester hours or more at the upper level at Mount Mercy toward the second major, not used toward a previous major.

A second major, whether taken while working toward the first degree or subsequently, is not to be confused with a second baccalaureate degree. Earning a second major is generally more economical in time and money than earning a second baccalaureate degree.

A student already possessing a Bachelor’s degree and completing a second major will not receive a diploma, will not be eligible to earn honors, nor will the student be eligible to participate in graduation ceremonies.

Second Baccalaureate Degree

Mount Mercy current students: Current students are not eligible for a second baccalaureate degree. See Second Major section preceding this section.

A Mount Mercy graduate or a person who holds a baccalaureate degree from an institution whose accreditation is comparable to that granted by Mount Mercy may earn a second baccalaureate degree at Mount Mercy by fulfilling the following requirements:

  1. The student must be admitted or readmitted to Mount Mercy and to a major other than the major of the original degree.
  2. The original degree must be completed and not in progress before the student begins work toward the second degree.
  3. The student must earn at least 30 consecutive semester hours at Mount Mercy beyond the original degree, with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 (or higher, if the designated major requires a higher average).
  4. The student must fulfill all of the requirements of a major (different than the original major) as described in the Catalog in effect at the time of admission or readmission, including at least 12 semester hours numbered 200 or above, in the major earned at Mount Mercy.
  5. Pass/Fail grades in courses used for completion of the second degree are unacceptable unless the course is designated in this Catalog solely as a Pass/Fail course.

Core curriculum requirements at Mount Mercy do not apply to students earning a second degree. Social Work students’ core curriculum will be reviewed in the Department of Social Work with regard to any request for a second baccalaureate degree. Teacher Education students may have additional core curriculum or prerequisite requirements and should consult with the Teacher Education department. Nursing students may have additional core curriculum or prerequisite requirements and should consult with the Nursing department.

The student who earns a second baccalaureate degree will receive a Mount Mercy diploma and may participate in graduation ceremonies. The student shall not be eligible for graduation honors, with exceptions granted by petition through the Provost's office. An important consideration in the decision will be the cumulative GPA from the previous degree.

Second-Grade Option

The second-grade option occurs when a student repeats a course previously taken at Mount Mercy or previously transferred into Mount Mercy. If the student repeats a Mount Mercy course with another Mount Mercy course, both grades stay on the permanent record, but the first grade is not calculated into the grade point average and the last grade stands as the official grade and is the only grade calculated into the grade point average. If a student transfers in a course from another institution prior to repeating the course at Mount Mercy, both grades stay on the permanent record, but the first grade is not calculated into the grade point average and the Mount Mercy grade stands as the official grade and is calculated into the grade point average. If a student repeats a Mount Mercy course with a course from another institution, transferred in after the course was taken at Mount Mercy, both grades stay on the permanent record and the grades of the two courses are averaged for purpose of the cumulative grade point average. Approval for this action must be given by the Registrar.

Students who wish to use the second grade option must complete a form in the Registrar’s Office. If the course was taken for a grade the first time, it must be taken for a grade the second time. If the course was taken pass/fail the first time, it may be taken pass/fail or for a grade the second time.

A student may only use the second-grade option once per course. Courses that are a part of the Bachelor’s degree earned at Mount Mercy are not approved for second grade options after the degree has been awarded.

Audit

If students desire to attend a course without working for or expecting credit for the course, they may do so by audit. There is a fee to audit a regular class and a separate fee for a laboratory or activity-type class such as photography, graphic design, painting, play production, creative writing, etc. Please see the section on tuition and fees.

New students wishing to audit a course are required to complete a special application from the Admission Office and must request an application to audit form from the Provost's Office. This application must be completed and returned to the Provost's Office where approval must be given before the student will be allowed to register for the course(s). Continuing students must also request an application to audit form from the vice president for academic affairs and upon approval must use the add form and submit it to the Registrar’s Office to register for the course.

In all cases, students auditing a course are required to have the paperwork properly approved and registration submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the end of the add period for each semester to become registered into the class as an audit. Students have the option to change a registered course to an audit or an audit course to a registered course up to the last day of the add period for a given semester. Changes will not be allowed past the last day of the add period. Students auditing a course are required to follow the normal drop procedure to officially withdraw from a course.

Administrative Policies

Calendar, Course Patterns and Student Load

The academic calendar is divided into a 14-week fall semester (August–December), a four-week winter term (January), and a 14-week spring semester (February–May). Mount Mercy also offers a summer program. The summer program includes two, individual five-week sessions, that combine to make the summer semester.

Summer-school students may take up to two courses during each five-week session.

Mount Mercy employs variable credit. Each course carries its own credit value. The unit of credit is the semester hour. One semester hour of credit is awarded for each 50-minute class meeting per week per term. Each two-hour laboratory session per week per semester awards one semester hour credit.

Full-time status at Mount Mercy is designated by the enrollment in 12.0 or more semester hours per semester. Part-time status at Mount Mercy is designated by enrollment in less than 12.0 semester hours in a given semester. The winter term is included with the spring semester for calculation of full-time status.

Winter Term

As part of the mission of liberal education at Mount Mercy, winter term and the courses offered are designed to provide students with an unusual opportunity to move outside the formal structure of the academic disciplines in order to broaden their knowledge, to explore values and interrelationships, to seek new perspectives and to develop new skills and interests.

Winter term includes courses that may meet requirements for the major, minor, core curriculum or general electives.

Full-time students are not required to enroll in winter term, but are expected to enroll in winter term in order to make progress toward graduation. Tuition for one winter term class is waived for those students who pay full-time tuition for both the fall and spring semesters. If a student chooses not to enroll in winter term, the tuition is not refunded. Students are encouraged to make good use of winter term.

Student Status and Progress

Academic Standing

Academic standing is expressed by the cumulative grade point average. (Determined by dividing the grade points by the total number of graded semester hours). Satisfactory academic status is maintained when this ratio is 2.00, a C average or above.

Academic Probation

Students will be placed on probation when they have not achieved a cumulative grade point average of 2.00. If there are pending ‘Incomplete’ grades at the end of the term, probation and dismissal notification will occur after those grades are submitted, typically at the end of the allocated thirty (30) day period.

Freshman students, as determined by credit hours earned, are not placed on probation until they have attempted two semesters; however, they are warned of probation at the end of their first term if the cumulative grade point average is below 2.00. When placed on probation or warned of it, students will be directed to meet with the Academic Center for Excellence Director. At this time, issues affecting performance will be identified and an Academic Improvement Plan will be agreed upon by the student, the Director, and the faculty advisor.

Academic Dismissal

A student is subject to academic dismissal for either of two reasons: 1) Students on academic probation who have attempted an additional two semesters will be dismissed if the cumulative grade point average has not been raised to 2.00; or 2) students who complete any semester (after their first semester) with a semester grade point average below .50 and a cumulative grade point average below 2.00 will be dismissed.

Students receive a letter of notification of academic dismissal from the Provost. Students who have been dismissed may not enroll at Mount Mercy until they have been reinstated or readmitted.

Reinstatement

Dismissed students may submit a written appeal to the Provost within two weeks of receipt of the dismissal letter. The Academic Review Committee will review the appeal for immediate reinstatement. The Academic Review Committee consists of the student’s academic advisor, the academic department chairperson(s), the Registrar, the Vice President for Enrollment and Student Life, the Director of Financial Aid and the Provost.

Readmission

Dismissed students may apply for readmission to Mount Mercy after two 14-week semesters (fall/spring) and must demonstrate to the Admission Committee a reasonable capability to raise and maintain their cumulative grade point average to at least a 2.00. The Admission Committee will either approve or deny readmission of the dismissed student based on information provided.

Dismissal From Mount Mercy

In order to safeguard its scholastic integrity and its moral atmosphere, Mount Mercy reserves the right to remove any student from a residential facility and/or suspend or dismiss any student. See the Good Book for a discussion of policies governing student behavior and academic integrity.

Enrollment at Other Institutions

Students who have begun their studies at Mount Mercy are expected to complete the remainder of their coursework at the University. Exceptions may be granted based on applicable cross-registration agreements, participation in approved study abroad programs, requirements of a major, or special circumstances affecting student progress in the major.

Mount Mercy students should not enroll for academic credit at other collegiate institutions without the permission of the Provost. The procedure is as follows: 1) petition acceptance of the course, 2) list the course to be taken and attach a course description to the petition, 3) state how the course is to be applied toward the Mount Mercy degree – core curriculum, major, minor or elective credit, and 4) provide a rationale for the request. Petition forms are available in the Provost's Office or Registrar's Office. Failure to seek prior approval may result in a course not being accepted for transfer credit.

Upon course completion, students must request an official transcript documenting the course be sent to the Registrar’s Office at Mount Mercy. Note: a minimum of 30 consecutive semester hours must be completed at Mount Mercy immediately preceding graduation.

Duration of Program

Students will be allowed 10 years to complete their initial program. The 10 year period will begin with the student’s initial start date at the institution. If a student stops out and then returns within the 10 year period, the student has the option of changing to any current program in effect or completing the original program within the original 10 year period. If the student does not complete the initial program within the 10 year period, the student will be required to complete the current program in effect at the end of the 10 year period, or the program in effect at the time the student re-admits to Mount Mercy after the 10 year period has expired. For programs leading to certification or licensure, or in cases where courses are no longer available, changes may be required earlier.

Classification

Students are classified according to the number of semester hours earned toward the degree. Those who meet the entrance requirements and have earned 29 semester hours or less toward the degree are classified as freshmen. Students must have 30 semester hours before they may be classified as sophomores, 60 semester hours before they may be classified as juniors and 90 semester hours before they may be classified as seniors.

Attendance

Students are expected to attend all classes. They are responsible for work missed through any absence. Only those who have enrolled in the course may attend the class meetings.

A student who appears on the class list for a fall or spring class, but who has not attended the first two class meetings (or the first class session for classes meeting just once per week) and has not notified the course instructor as to the reason for his/her absence will be reported to the Registrar’s Office as a “no show” and will be dropped from the course. Official attendance is taken twice during the fall and spring semesters for purposes of validating class rosters and meeting Federal regulations. Attendance is not recorded for winter or summer courses, nor are students dropped for “no show”.

Students who do not attend the first class session in a block class will be reported to the Registrar’s Office as a “no show” and will receive a grade of NA (Never Attend). See the Accelerated section of this Catalog for tuition charges involving No Shows. This is implemented in order to free up class space for students waiting to enroll in class.

Adding and Dropping Courses

During the add period of each semester or term, changes in registration will not result in a course change fee. No course may be added after the date posted in the academic calendar as the last day to add a course. In order to add a course, a student must submit to the Registrar’s Office a completed Add/Drop Form, which requires the advisor’s signature and the instructor’s signature of the class being added or dropped. To drop a course during this period, the advisor’s signature is required. Students can also add and drop courses online before the semester begins.

Students desiring to drop a course, but remain enrolled in other classes for the given semester, may contact the Registrar’s Office for the drop form. Students should consider how the decision to drop will affect any of the following: tuition charges, financial aid, social security, employer reimbursement, veteran’s benefits, or scholarships. The ability to maintain athletic eligibility, to maintain a student visa (international students), or to purchase insurance as a student may also be affected as a result of the decision to drop, and should adhere to deadlines for this procedure.

Enrollment in the class officially ceases when a student submits a completed Drop Form to the Registrar’s Office. A grade of “W” will appear on the student’s grade report and official transcript if the course was dropped after the last day of the add period. The official date of the drop is the date used for figuring tuition refund, if applicable. The last day to drop a class is listed in the academic calendar.

The last day to add a class is listed in the academic calendar. See the Accelerated Programs section of this Catalog for applicable add/drop policies.

Withdrawal from Mount Mercy

Students who decide to leave Mount Mercy after the semester or term has begun must officially withdraw through the Academic Affairs Office. Withdrawing from all courses in a given semester constitutes a withdrawal from Mount Mercy.

Students should initiate the withdrawal process by contacting the Academic Affairs Office. The official date of the withdrawal will be the date that the student initiates the withdrawal process. Withdrawing from Mount Mercy will change the student’s status. Students should consider how the decision to withdraw will affect any of the following: tuition charges, financial aid, social security, employer reimbursement, veteran’s benefits, or scholarships. The ability to maintain athletic eligibility, to maintain a student visa (international students), or to purchase insurance as a student may also be affected as a result of the decision to withdraw.

Students withdrawing from Mount Mercy before the last day of class receive “W” grades (withdraw) in their courses for the given semester. The students will be removed (deleted) from all registered courses in subsequent terms/semesters. Students that do not withdraw from the institution but quit attending all classes will receive the grade they earn in their courses. Any student desiring to return to Mount Mercy after withdrawal will be required to re-apply for admission through the Admissions Office.

Declining to Attend

If new Mount Mercy students notify the Admissions Office that they will not be entering Mount Mercy (decline to attend), prior to the first day of their beginning semester or term, they will have any registrations for the beginning semester or term and any subsequent registrations for upcoming semesters or terms dropped and no tuition charge will be assessed.

No Show

Any student who is determined to be in non-attendance or “No Show” in all of his or her classes for a given semester (Winter and summer terms excluded) will be considered as withdrawn from Mount Mercy and subject to the withdrawal guidelines.

Stop-Out

A student who stops-out for a semester (meaning not enrolled for a semester but has not gone through the official withdrawal process) will be subject to the same guidelines as having officially withdrawn from the institution. Any student stopping-out for a semester will be required to re-apply for admission through the Admissions Office. Additionally, the student should consider how the decision to stop-out will affect tuition charges, financial aid, social security, employer reimbursement, veteran’s benefits, or scholarships. The ability to maintain athletic eligibility, to maintain a student visa, or to purchase insurance as a student may also be affected as a result of the decision to stop-out.

See the Accelerated Programs section of this Catalog for withdrawal policies for the accelerated programs.

Veterans Services

Students eligible for educational benefits from the Veterans Administration should report to the Registrar’s Office prior to the first term of attendance. After the veteran has supplied the necessary documents, enrollment certification will be submitted to the regional VA office. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the Registrar of any changes in registration. Failure to properly alert the Registrar of changes in enrollment may result in loss, delay, or repayment of educational benefits.

Honors Program

The Honors Program offers outstanding students the opportunity to go beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries. Honors courses feature small class size, hands-on learning, and high levels of interaction between students and professors. Students graduating with Distinction in Honors will be awarded honors cords to be worn at graduation and will receive recognition on their transcripts and diplomas.

Admission to the Honors Program

The Honors Program is open to first year students with a minimum ACT composite standard score of 26, a minimum high school GPA of 3.60, and a high school class rank in the top quartile. Transfer or continuing students with a sophomore standing and a minimum GPA of 3.40 may apply for admittance to the Honors Program by contacting the Honors Director. Students who do not meet the stated criteria but feel they could do well in the Honors Program may petition the Honors Director for probationary admittance to the Honors Program.

Transferring Honors Courses from Other Colleges and Universities

Transfer students who have successfully completed honors courses at other colleges and universities may petition for the courses to apply towards Honors requirements at Mount Mercy.

Graduating with Distinction in the Honors Program

In order to graduate with distinction in the Honors Program, a student must:

  1. Complete a minimum of 12 semester hours in classes designated Honors. At least six semester hours (two courses) must be Honors Seminars;
  2. Have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.40; and
  3. Earn a minimum 3.00 grade point in each Honor Seminar and each honors course used in the required 12 semester hours.

Core Curriculum Honors Sections

First year students admitted to the Honors Program may enroll in honors sections of core curriculum courses. Students are encouraged to complete as many of their core curriculum requirements as they wish within the Honors Program.

Upper Division Honors Seminars

Honors seminars are unique interdisciplinary courses taught by faculty from diverse disciplines. Students participate in interactive learning and examine topics from a variety of perspectives. Continuing honors students with sophomore standing and minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 are eligible to enroll in honors seminars. Students must complete at least two honors seminars to graduate with Distinction in the Honors Program.

Honors Articulation with Kirkwood Community College

Mount Mercy University and Kirkwood Community College (KCC) Honors Program have developed a partnership which allows a KCC Honors program student to take either one Mount Mercy Honors section course or any three-credit hours course free of charge. For specific requirements and details contact the Honors Program Director at Mount Mercy University.

Grading System

Unit of Credit

The unit of credit is the semester hour. Most courses are three semester hours and represent approximately three hours per week in class with additional work outside of class during the regular terms. Winter term contact hours are approximately equal to that of the regular terms. Accelerated courses meet for approximately one-half the usual contact hours but require adult students to do significant additional independent work.

Grading System

Mount Mercy uses the letter system of grading as well as pass-fail, which is given the following interpretation:

Grade Grade Points Description
A 4.00A grade of “A” indicates varying degrees of extraordinary achievement and intellectual initiative
A- 3.67A grade of “A” indicates varying degrees of extraordinary achievement and intellectual initiative
B+ 3.33A grade of "B" indicates gradations of high achievement - definitely better than average.
B 3.00A grade of "B" indicates gradations of high achievement - definitely better than average.
B- 2.67A grade of "B" indicates gradations of high achievement - definitely better than average.
C+ 2.33A grade of "C" indicates a range of average achievement with students having grasped at least the essential objectives.
C 2.00A grade of "C" indicates a range of average achievement with students having grasped at least the essential objectives.
C- 1.67A grade of "C" indicates a range of average achievement with students having grasped at least the essential objectives.
D+ 1.33A grade of "D" indicates that course work is inferior in quality, but passing.
D 1.00A grade of "D" indicates that course work is inferior in quality, but passing.
D- 0.67A grade of "D" indicates that course work is inferior in quality, but passing.
F 0.00A grade of "F" indicates failure to meet the requirements of the course.
NANon-attendance
WWithdrawal from course
IStudents whose work had been satisfactory, but who for acceptable reasons have been unable to complete courses, may be given marks of I (incomplete). The courses must be completed and a new grade submitted to the registrar no later than one calendar month from the original due date for grades. If no change is reported the I becomes an F. If an extension is needed, students must obtain the permission of the instructor, who must inform the Registrar’s Office of the extension.

Changes in Course Grades

Course grades will not be changed after one full semester has elapsed following the issued grade. Students who believe that a change of their grade is warranted must initiate the appropriate steps to appeal their grade, and must complete any subsequent work the instructor agrees to consider, within this time period.

Grade Point Average

The cumulative grade point average is calculated by dividing cumulative grade points by cumulative hours graded.

Pass/Fail Policy

In order to encourage exploration into academic disciplines, Mount Mercy offers a pass/fail grade option. There are two instances in which a course may be graded pass/fail:

  1. Instructor-designated, in which the course is offered pass/fail for all students in a class, (i.e. lab or field experience).
  2. Student-elected, in which the student chooses pass/fail rather than a letter grade on an individual basis.

A grade of pass (P) denotes academic achievement equivalent to a grade of D- or better; a grade of fail (F) does not increase credits. A pass or fail grade does not affect the term or cumulative grade point average for instructor-designated pass/fail. A fail (F) grade for student-elected pass/fail does affect the term and cumulative grade point average.

Student-Elected Pass/Fail: The pass/fail option cannot be applied to courses that students must take to fulfill requirements in the major, minor or in core curriculum. Students may elect pass/fail grading for a maximum of 18 semester hours during their college career. Any transferred pass/fail hours from other institutions are considered part of this 18 semester hour total. Transferred courses with grades of pass/fail will not be applied to any requirement in the major, minor, or core curriculum.

Procedure: Students elect pass/fail through the Registrar’s Office. The instructor is not officially notified of whether a student is on regular letter grading or pass/fail. The instructor submits all grades as letter grades; the registrar transposes letter grades to a grade of pass (P) or fail (F).

Students can elect to take a class pass/fail until the last day to add for the respective semester. Students have the option toward the end of the course, during dates posted by the Registrar’s Office which is the last week of classes (prior to finals week) for the respective semester, to take either the grade of pass (P) or fail (F) or the letter grade submitted by the instructor. Students may not change pass/fail designation after the deadline.

Instructor-Designated Pass/Fail: A grade of pass (P) means satisfactory mastery of the expected skills, knowledge and competencies of the course; a grade of fail (F) means failure to meet the expected skills, knowledge and competencies of the course. There is no limit on this type of pass/fail credit.

Non-Course Pass Credit: CLEP tests and Mount Mercy Challenge exams are considered instructor-designated pass/fail courses. A maximum of 60 semester hours may be earned using these options, as well as any other non-course credit awarded on a pass/fail basis.

Fresh Start Rule

Students who have been absent from Mount Mercy for three or more years may petition for the Fresh Start Rule. By this rule, only courses with grades of C or better (C- does not count) will be counted for credit toward graduation. However, all courses, affected by the fresh start rule, (including transfer coursework) and the grade earned for each course, will remain on the student’s permanent record but will not factor into the cumulative GPA or be counted toward graduation.

The petition is submitted to the Provost for a fresh start. If the petition is approved, the students resume their program with a cumulative grade point/hour ratio or grade point average consisting of C grades or better (C- does not count).

Midterm, Final Grade Reports and Official Transcripts

Midterm reports are available online to freshmen and to students who are not doing satisfactory work. Final grade reports are available on-line through myMountMercy for viewing at the end of each academic term. Students who need a hard copy grade report for reimbursement purposes may contact the Registrar’s Office.

Official transcripts of credits will be sent by the Registrar’s Office upon online or written request by the student. The student’s signature is required for the release of a transcript. Fees are $7.00 for an official transcript and must be paid in advance. No transcript can be sent if the student has not paid his or her financial account in full, or has outstanding paperwork with the Student Financial Services Office. Please allow for appropriate processing time.

Academic Integrity

Mount Mercy values integrity and honesty in all aspects of academics and campus life. As part of the academic mission, the institution provides the following Definitions and Procedures for which all students are responsible. The Mount Mercy community encourages all students to carefully consider these definitions, to adhere to these standards, and to ask for guidance if in doubt.

Cheating

Cheating is an act or an attempted act of dishonesty that includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Copying:
    • another person’s work, in whole or in part, in an examination or for an assignment, with or without their consent, or
    • allowing another person to copy your work, in whole or in part, on an examination or for an assignment.
  • Using unauthorized materials or technology:
    • during an examination. (Examples would be answers passed to you, view of a calculator output, or text messages on a cell phone; however, other instances may apply).
    • to complete an assignment.
  • Collaboration during an assignment or during an examination when prohibited by the instructor.
  • Taking an examination for another person or letting a person take an exam for you.
  • Completing an assignment for another person or letting a person complete an assignment for you.
  • Forging needed signatures on academic work.
  • Altering of grades or other official educational records.
  • Obtaining a copy of an examination without permission from the class instructor.
  • Fabricating or falsifying information or data; or deliberately misrepresenting information for an assignment.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is using somebody else’s words, expression of ideas, data, images, or other creative products without acknowledgment or attribution. Plagiarism includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Copying, paraphrasing, or blending words, images, or ideas that are not common knowledge without acknowledging the source.
  • Providing false, insufficient or incomplete acknowledgment of sources.
  • Claiming authorship of a work that is not one’s own or that is the result of unauthorized joint effort, including purchasing, downloading, or otherwise acquiring the work.

Academic Misconduct

Academic Misconduct includes acts that are considered unethical, dishonest, deceitful or inappropriate. Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Attempting to gain an advantage over another individual by preventing access to needed books, materials, or aids.
  • Planning with another individual to commit any act of academic dishonesty.
  • Forging signatures on official college documents.
  • Breaking or entering an office or building to attempt to obtain an exam or other materials.
  • Submitting the same work for different classes without disclosure to and approval from the class instructor.
  • Receiving credit on group assignments without contributing.
  • Misrepresenting illness or personal crises, or otherwise intentionally misleading instructors as an excuse for missed or late academic work.

Academic cheating, plagiarism, and misconduct may be referred to collectively as “Academic Dishonesty.” There are varying degrees of academic dishonesty. Suggested consequences for infractions are included below in order to promote consistency and equity. Mount Mercy reserves the right to act upon incidents of academic dishonesty that are not explicitly defined in the above policy.

Procedures

Faculty and Student Commitment To Policy

Students will sign an acknowledgment at the beginning of their enrollment at Mount Mercy that they have been informed of Mount Mercy’s Academic Integrity Policy. At the initial registration, each student will receive a copy of the policy and will sign an acknowledgment form to be retained in the advising folder.

Students will sign a form with the following language:

  • I have been informed that Mount Mercy has an Academic Integrity Policy.
  • As part of the Academic Integrity Policy, definitions for cheating, plagiarism, and academic misconduct are provided, along with a list of possible consequences for committing these violations.
  • I understand that violations of the Academic Integrity Policy are subject to serious consequences.
  • I understand that the Academic Integrity Policy provides procedures for resolving disputes regarding academic dishonesty.
  • I am aware that this policy is available for review in both the Good Book and on myCampus.

All instructors are expected to cultivate integrity on campus and to affirm Mount Mercy’s policy by introducing and discussing the Definitions of Academic Dishonesty and Misconduct at the beginning of each course and directing students to sources where the definitions can be found. Instructors should speak to the particular ways that Mount Mercy’s Academic Integrity Policy applies to their courses.

The Academic Integrity Committee

Mount Mercy will form an Academic Integrity Committee to investigate and evaluate cases of suspected Academic Dishonesty and Misconduct as well as to recommend to the Provost methods to promote a culture of academic integrity on campus.

Membership: Three (3) faculty members from three (3) different departments, elected by the faculty annually for staggered two-year terms; an alternate faculty member from a different department; two (2) student representatives from two (2) different majors appointed by the Student Government Association; an alternate student from a major in a different department; Director of the Academic Center for Excellence; Provost and Director of Faculty Development, ex-officio. In cases involving students in accelerated programs, the Associate Provost will serve as a member of the Committee, replacing one faculty member. If the Associate Provost has a conflict with parties involved, the Assistant Provost will serve as the alternate. Graduate students who have questions should contact the Associate Provost. The voting members will elect co-chairs. During an evaluation of suspected Academic Dishonesty, faculty members or students directly involved in the case or within the same department as the student(s) and faculty involved will excuse themselves and be replaced by their alternates. Members of the committee should recuse themselves from deliberation and decisions if there is a potential conflict of interest, and the alternate will take their place. At least three (3) voting members must be present for the Committee to take formal action.

The Committee will maintain minutes of its meetings.

Suspected Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy

All information regarding cases of suspected or confirmed Academic Dishonesty will be provided to only those with a need to know. Any suspected incident or dispute shall be raised to the appropriate party within five (5) business days of obtaining knowledge of the alleged violation. When allegations of academic dishonesty involve two or more students, each student will be evaluated on an individual basis. The following defines procedures, responsibilities and timelines for reporting suspected incidences of Academic Dishonesty.

Informal Faculty Resolution

Mount Mercy encourages faculty members and students to informally resolve incidents of alleged academic dishonesty. Faculty members have the discretion to resolve cases of suspected academic dishonesty or misconduct on their own, including determining the consequence imposed outlined below. Faculty are urged to consult the suggested consequences outlined below. Faculty should check with the Academic Affairs Office to determine if the student(s) in question have a pattern of academic dishonesty before informally resolving a case of academic dishonesty.

A written record of a faculty resolved incident of academic dishonesty or misconduct, signed by the student, will be sent to the Academic Affairs Office by the faculty member. The record will detail the suspected academic dishonesty and the outcome. This report is not for purposes of reviewing an individual incident and resolution, but rather for the Academic Integrity Committee to monitor patterns of dishonesty (i.e., types of cheating, types of resolutions, identifying students who become “repeat offenders”). The Academic Affairs Office will collect and retain these reports solely for purposes of data analysis and pattern monitoring.

Upon accusation of academic dishonesty or misconduct, the student or the faculty member have the right to refer the incident to the department chair or the Academic Integrity Committee.

Department Chair Resolution

The department chair may attempt to mediate and resolve a dispute over the suspected academic dishonesty or misconduct. If either the student or faculty member is not satisfied with the outcome, either party has the right to refer the incident to the Academic Integrity Committee.

A written record of a chair resolved incident of academic dishonesty or misconduct will be sent to the Provost's Office by the chair. The record will detail the suspected academic dishonesty and the outcome, and will be signed by the student. This report is not for purposes of reviewing an individual incident and resolution, but rather for the Academic Integrity Committee to monitor patterns of dishonesty (i.e., types of cheating, types of resolutions, identifying students who become “repeat offenders”).

Academic Integrity Committee Resolution

Referral

Self-Referral: Students who commit acts of academic dishonesty or misconduct may refer themselves to the Provost within five (5) business days of their violation. Students in the accelerated programs may refer themselves to the Adult Accelerated Office, 207 Basile, and the matter will be forwarded to the Provost. The incidence will be reported to the instructor as well as the Academic Integrity Committee which will maintain a record of the incident. If agreeable with the instructor, a first offense will not meet with disciplinary action; however, the Committee may refer the student for counseling and/or wish to speak with the student about the offense. The student will still be required to complete the assignment or complete a different assignment after consultation with the instructor. Repeated offenses, although self-reported, will not be tolerated and will require a decision by the Academic Integrity Committee as to appropriate action.

Faculty/Student: In the event that an alleged incident of academic dishonesty or misconduct cannot be resolved informally with the student and faculty member, and/or the department chair, the student or faculty member shall provide written documentation of their concerns to the Provost, within five (5) business days of the faculty member or chair’s decision. Students in the accelerated programs may refer themselves to the Adult Accelerated Office, 207 Basile, and the matter will be forwarded to the Provost.

Procedure Following Referral to the Academic Integrity Committee

  1. The Provost shall notify the Academic Integrity Committee within six (6) business days of receipt of a complaint.
  2. The Provost shall notify the interested parties in writing of the specific allegations of Academic Dishonesty within six (6) business days of the referral to the Office of the Provost, including a request for the submission of relevant written materials. Interested parties will then have six (6) business days to submit any relevant materials to the Provost’s office.
  3. The Provost will provide all materials to the Academic Integrity Committee. Upon receipt, the voting members will decide within six (6) business days whether the allegations warrant a hearing. A vote of one of these members will warrant a hearing, otherwise the allegations will be closed because there is not sufficient evidence to proceed.
  4. If a hearing is warranted, the chair will notify all parties and schedule a hearing within ten (10) business days. The chair will contact all parties in writing, through the Provost’s Office, providing a brief statement of why a hearing was not warranted.
  5. Within these ten (10) business days, the Academic Integrity Committee may gather relevant information to the case. The Academic Integrity Committee may solicit information from other students in the class or other members of the Mount Mercy community at their discretion or upon request of any person involved in the allegation. At the hearing, the Academic Integrity Committee will meet with all parties and witnesses. The proceedings will be recorded; this record will be available on a need to know basis and maintained in the Provost's Office.
  6. If the student wishes to challenge the allegations of Academic Dishonesty, he/she must appear before the Academic Integrity Committee at the hearing. If a student does not appear at the hearing, the student waives all rights of appeal. In the event of a conflicting schedule, a faculty member may choose not to attend the hearing and allow his/her written materials to state his/her side of the case.
  7. If the student wishes to admit to the charges, he/she must state so in writing to the Academic Integrity Committee, which will consult with the student and instructor to determine the appropriate action.
  8. A decision, by majority vote of the voting members present at the hearing, shall be made based on the evidence presented at the hearing, along with other relevant materials gained through investigation by the Academic Integrity Committee. A written letter with findings and recommendations shall be prepared by the Committee and submitted to the Provost, along with copies sent to both parties, within six (6) business days of the hearing. The Committee shall refer to the list below for possible consequences.
  9. Once the findings and recommendations of the Academic Integrity Committee are submitted, within six (6) business days the Provost shall issue a final decision and notify in writing the interested parties and the Academic Integrity Committee. The Provost may consider additional information prior to making the decision.
  10. After receiving the final written decision of the Provost, any party to the dispute may appeal this decision. A written letter summarizing the grounds for contesting this decision must be submitted to the President of Mount Mercy, 210 Warde, within three (3) business days. Within 30 business days, the President shall render a final written decision based upon review of the submitted information, findings, and recommendations. A copy shall be provided to the involved parties, the Provost, and the Academic Integrity Committee. The decision of the President is final.
  11. In cases where an allegation of academic dishonesty is submitted towards the end of a fall, winter, or spring semester and members of the Academic Integrity Committee are not able to convene, the above-mentioned procedure will require special modifications by the Provost. This may include but is not limited to modifications in the timeline for responding at each level of the process and may involve a reconfiguration of the membership of the Academic Integrity Committee so that decisions are rendered in an equitable manner.

Consequences for Academic Dishonesty or Misconduct

Based upon the gravity of the Academic Dishonesty, different academic sanctions may be appropriate. For instance, the nature of the incident and the personal history or prior offenses by an individual student are relevant factors to weigh. A suggested spectrum of offenses and examples are included below. Faculty are urged to consider these suggested sanctions in order to promote consistency and equity.

Simple offense

Example: Student fails to properly cite sources one or two times in a paper, but the remainder of the paper is cited properly.

Types of Sanctions: The student is given the opportunity to re-do the assignment, or an alternate assignment, for a reduced grade. The student is required to meet with the Director of the Academic Center for Excellence and commit to a plan for improvement.

Serious offense

Examples: Student is caught looking over at another student’s test. Significant parts of a paper are not properly quoted and cited.

Types of Sanctions: The student receives a failing grade for the assignment, but is allowed to continue in the course.

Aggravated offense

Examples: Student submits an entire paper from the Internet that is not his/her own. Organized cheating with multiple students. Stealing tests.

Types of Sanctions: The student receives a failing grade for the course.

Repeated offenses

Example: Student engages in academic misconduct in more than one course. Note: To monitor this type of misconduct, it is essential that faculty submit Academic Dishonesty Reports for each incident.

Types of Sanctions: Expulsion from Mount Mercy is warranted.

A more complete list of possible consequences is detailed below. One or more consequences may be appropriate.

Counseling: The student(s) may be referred to appropriate counseling for assistance and education that will help prevent future incidences of Academic Dishonesty.

Educational sanction: The student(s) may be required to attend an educational program on academic integrity, ethics, or related subject. The student may receive instructions, re-do the assignment with consultation from the instructor, or complete a new, alternative assignment with consultation from the instructor. The student may be responsible for related expenses, including expenses for education, counseling, or treatment, if any expense is entailed.

Forfeiture of Grade on the Assignment: For the assignment to be given no credit, and the student(s) may continue the class with zero points for the assignment.

Failure of the Course: The student(s) will receive a grade of ‘F’ for the course.

Exclusion from Mount Mercy facilities or activities: The student(s) may be prohibited from attending a class, undertaking Mount Mercy employment, entering a building, participating in an extracurricular activity sponsored by the institution, representing Mount Mercy in an official capacity, or using other services provided by the institution. Such exclusion may be for a definite or indefinite period of time.

Probation: The student may be placed on probation for Academic Dishonesty. If further incidents of Academic Dishonesty occur, the student will be recommended for expulsion.

Disciplinary suspension: The student(s) may be involuntarily separated from Mount Mercy for a stated period of time after which readmission is possible. The Provost shall determine when the suspension will become effective. A student with one or more violations may be suspended from Mount Mercy for an indefinite period of time. A student suspended indefinitely may petition the Provost for reinstatement.

Expulsion: For a serious violation of the Academic Integrity Policy or repeated violations, the student(s) may be dismissed from Mount Mercy permanently.

Honors and awards

Mount Mercy awards honors to students who maintain a high academic standing and who are distinguished for their loyalty, cooperation and service. These honors include the following:

Dean’s List

The Dean’s List is compiled at the end of the fall and spring semesters. All students with a semester GPA of 3.60 or better and who are enrolled in six (6) or more graded semester hours are eligible for inclusion on the Dean’s List. Note: credit hours taken as pass/fail do NOT qualify for the Dean’s List. Students with Incomplete (I) grades are ineligible for consideration during that term.

Latin Honors

Academic honors are awarded at graduation in recognition of superior scholarship:

  1. The distinction summa cum laude is given to students whose cumulative grade point average is 3.80 or above.
  2. The distinction magna cum laude is given to students whose cumulative grade point average is 3.60 to 3.79.
  3. The distinction cum laude is given to students whose cumulative grade point average is 3.40 to 3.59.

These honors are announced at commencement and are inscribed on the diplomas of the recipients. The diploma and transcript will bear honors based on the official, final cumulative GPA.

Students participating in the Medical Laboratory Science program will be recognized at Commencement if they have earned academic honors at the end of their junior year of studies at Mount Mercy.

Students earning second baccalaureate degrees will not be eligible for honors except by approval of petition.

The Mary Catherine McAuley Award

Mary Catherine McAuley founded the Sisters of Mercy in Ireland in 1831. This award, the highest honor given a student attending Mount Mercy for four years, is conferred upon the graduate who, in addition to a high scholastic rating (3.00 or above), has exemplified to a marked degree cooperation with administration, faculty and students; integrity in his/her personal relationships; and leadership and loyalty in furthering the ideals of Mount Mercy. This award is presented at commencement exercises held in May.

The Mary Frances Warde Award

Mary Frances Warde founded the Sisters of Mercy in America in 1843. This award, the highest honor given a student who has transferred into Mount Mercy for their first degree and has acquired a minimum of 30 semester hours at the institution, is conferred upon the graduate who, in addition to a high scholastic rating (3.00 or above), has exemplified to a marked degree cooperation with administration, faculty, and students; integrity in his/her personal relationships; and leadership and loyalty in furthering the ideals of Mount Mercy. This award is presented at commencement exercises held in May.

 

Honor Societies

Alpha Kappa Delta is the national honor society for students in Sociology.

Alpha Phi Sigma is the national honor society for students in Criminal Justice.

Kappa Gamma Pi is the National Catholic College Graduate Honor Society. Membership, which is limited to not more than 10 percent of the graduating class, is based on scholarship, leadership and service. Members are selected not only for recognition of past accomplishments, but also in anticipation of future service.

Kappa Xi Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau International represents Mount Mercy’s chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International, the honor society of nursing. Founded in 1922, the society is committed to recognizing excellence in nursing education and practice. Membership is limited to senior nursing students and community nursing professionals.

Pi Sigma Alpha is the national honor society for students in Political Science.

Psi Chi is the national honor society for students in Psychology.

Awards

Recognition in specific areas is given to graduating students for outstanding academic performance. Graduation recognitions include the following:

The Outstanding Accounting Student Award
Given by the Iowa Society of Certified Public Accountants, Hawkeye Chapter.

The Outstanding Economics Student Award
Given by the business department to a graduating senior for superior academic performance in economics courses.

The Outstanding Finance Student Award
Given by the business department to a graduating senior for superior academic performance in finance courses.

The Dale Harrison Outstanding Management Student Award
Given to the graduating senior in the business department who has compiled the most outstanding scholastic record.

The Outstanding Human Resource Management Student Award
Given by the business department to a graduating senior for superior academic performance in human resource management courses.

The Outstanding Marketing Student Award
Given by the business department to a graduating senior for superior academic performance in marketing courses.

The Outstanding SIFE Student Award
Given by the business department to a graduating senior for superior performance as a member of SIFE.

The Sister Mary Norbert Karnik Award
Given to a senior art student who has demonstrated exceptional ability as an artist and support for the profession of art.

The Biology Award
Given to the outstanding graduate in biology. The award is based on academic achievement and on participation in campus and/or community programs and activities.

The Sister Immaculata Business Award
Given to the outstanding graduating senior in the business department.

The Computer Science Award
Given to a graduating senior who has demonstrated outstanding achievement and involvement in computer science and who shows the potential for making a significant contribution to the field.

The Criminal Justice Award
Given for outstanding performance in the criminal justice major, promise of professional competence and contribution to the Mount Mercy criminal justice program.

The Sister Mary Xavier Award
Given to a student who has demonstrated exceptional ability in creative writing.

The Sister Mary Ildephonse Award
Named after the first president of Mount Mercy and a long-time teacher of English, and was established to recognize excellence in English. It is given annually to the graduating English major who has demonstrated talent and perception in analyzing and writing about language and literature.

The John P. Barthel Memorial Poetry Award
Established in 1985 by Mrs. Mildred Barthel in honor of her late husband, who practiced medicine for many years in the Cedar Rapids area. It is awarded to the student who wins the Barthel poetry competition.

The History Award
Given to a graduate in history for outstanding academic achievement in that field.

The Outstanding Honors Student Award
Given to a graduating senior who has excelled in honors classes and has made a positive contribution to Mount Mercy.

The Outstanding Journalism Student Award
Given to a graduate in journalism for outstanding academic achievement in that field.

The Mathematics Award
Given to a graduating senior who has demonstrated not only outstanding scholastic achievement in mathematics but also extraordinary insight into the nature of mathematics as an intellectual discipline.

The Music Award
Given to the outstanding graduating senior in music. The award is based on performances, scholastic ability and personal integrity.

The Sister Mary Edward Nursing Award
Given to the graduating senior who has best demonstrated high scholastic ability, professional integrity and the spirit of nursing.

The Sister Monica Ryan Philosophy Award
Given to the junior or senior who has done outstanding work in the study of philosophy.

The Political Science Award
Given to a major in political science for outstanding academic achievement in that field.

The Christine L. Woodruff Psychology Award
Given to a major in psychology for outstanding academic achievement in that field.

The Sister Mary Agnes Hennessey Award
For excellence in communication, is given annually to the graduating senior who personally, academically, and practically has demonstrated, throughout the program, exceptional achievement, leadership and promise as a communication major.

The Sister Siena Davis Religious Studies Award
Named in honor of Sister Siena Davis, chairperson of the department of religious studies at the time of her death in 1982, is given to a graduate majoring in religious studies who has demonstrated academic excellence by achieving above average grades in religious studies, and who has demonstrated a spirit of Christian service through participation in ministerial activities on and off campus.

The Anne K. Stenzel Social Work Award
Given to a graduating senior majoring in social work for distinguished academic achievement and the promise of professional competence.

The Nancy LaMorgese Sociology Award
Given to the senior graduating in sociology who has demonstrated a high level of proficiency in the development of a sociological research paper and has played an active role within the major and/or within the sociological forum and has shown a high quality of development and interest in the area of sociology.

The Sister Mary Lorenz Award
Given to a graduate in speech and drama for performance and cooperation in that field.

The Sister Roseline Kos Senior Education Award
Honoring an esteemed educator and leader of the teacher preparation program from 1975-1985, was established to help mark her 70th anniversary as a Sister of Mercy. The award is granted to a graduating senior in education who exemplifies the spirit of the Sisters of Mercy, demonstrates commitment to the mission, and meets all department requirements for licensure recommendation.

The Artists of Dionysus Award
A special award given to a student who, though not a speech and drama major, supported and participated in the Mount Mercy drama productions over the last four years. Like the Greek theatre artists who formulated the original theatre union, the Artists of Dionysus, they kept theatre alive in the last years of Greece. It is awarded to a student who helped perpetuate and improve theatre at Mount Mercy.

The President’s Award
Given to the graduating senior who has demonstrated during his/her tenure years at the institution outstanding perseverance and diligence in pursuing his/her goals.

The Co-Curricular Service Award
Given to those graduating seniors who have participated extensively and positively in campus and/or community programs and activities.

The Sister Mary Roberta Lyness Award
Given to a graduating senior who has best demonstrated commitment to public service and volunteer projects in the community.

The Sisters of Mercy Award
Given to a Mount Mercy student who exemplifies the mission of the Sisters of Mercy. This student has shown compassionate and respectful service to God’s people, has actively engaged in the work of justice through at least one or more of the Sisters of Mercy Critical Concerns: Earth, Immigration/Migration, Nonviolence, Poverty, Racism, Women.

SGA Leadership Recognition
Inspired by the contributions of D. Allan Boettger, former Student Activities Director. Underclass student who is a behind the scenes worker displaying leadership skills in their personal and extra curricular lives, actively involved in campus organization(s), and responsible for spearheading projects and/or organizing and implementing activities. (GPA of 2.00 or above.)

Who’s Who in American Universities and Colleges
Seniors whose academic standing is above average (GPA of 3.00 or above) and who demonstrate outstanding leadership in college activities and community service.

Underclass Recognitions

Scholar Recognitions
Full-time students who have maintained a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 4.00.

Freshman Honors Program Recognition
First-year, full-time students who successfully completed an honors course with excellence.

Freshman of the Year
Freshman student with accomplishments beyond requirements in addition to setting a positive example for his/her peers. The student should be active on campus, serve the community and display leadership. The recipient must have an annual GPA of 2.75 or above.

Sophomore of the Year
Sophomore student with accomplishments beyond requirements in addition to setting a positive example for his/her peers. The student should be active on campus, serve the community and display leadership. The recipient must have an annual GPA of 2.75 or above.

Junior of the Year
Junior student with accomplishments beyond requirements in addition to setting a positive example for his/her peers. The student should be active on campus, serve the community and display leadership. The recipient must have an annual GPA of 2.75 or above.

SGA Service Award
Underclass student(s) who demonstrated outstanding service to the campus or the outside community beyond requirements. The student should be active on campus, serve the community and display leadership. The recipient must have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or above.

SGA Organization of the Year
Recognition given to the campus organization that most benefits the campus through its membership, community service and sponsored campus activities.

SGA Faculty Award for Student Advocacy
Inspired by ‘the kid, the myth, the legend’ Dale Harrison, the award is presented to the faculty member that is most committed to the Mount Mercy community and dedicates the greatest level of advocacy for students.

SGA Most Improved Club of the Year
Awarded to the club that has improved the most over the course of one year through; membership, community service and sponsored activities.

SGA Leadership Recognition
Inspired by the contributions of D. Allan Boettger, former Student Activities Director. Presented to the underclass student who is a worker displaying leadership skills in their personal and extracurricular lives, actively involved in campus organization(s), and responsible for spearheading projects and/or organizing and implementing activities. Nominees considered for the recognition must be in good standing with Mount Mercy and have a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or above.

The Freshman Chemistry Achievement Award
Given to the freshman student in recognition for outstanding achievement in the sciences.

Nurses of Vision and Action (NOVA) Recognition for Nursing Students
The NOVA recognition program acknowledges the efforts made by nursing students throughout their educational program and will inspire students to continue to reach for their highest level of achievement. NOVA recognition centers around five elements of vision and action: scholarship, leadership, innovation, professionalism and service. Students are notified through the department of Nursing of Opportunities to be recognized.